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What's Up Magazine

Service for One

Jan 09, 2012 04:48PM ● By Anonymous
Though variations of the food pyramid have been around for years, do you still have trouble understanding and applying the information from it to your daily diet? Fortunately, the Harvard School of Public Health has created a new tool featuring the Healthy Eating Plate, which clearly shows the proportions of each food category a person should intake at each meal (or what to avoid). And doesn’t the plate shape make perfect sense? After all, most of us eat from dishes, not pyramids.


The U.S. Department of Agriculture has instituted a “dish” of their own called MyPlate. But, according to the Harvard School of Public Health, it is still lacking. MyPlate, they contend, “fails to give people some of the basic nutrition advice they need to choose a healthy diet.”

The Harvard folks give a clear example of their point: “MyPlate encourages consumers to make dairy products a regular part of their meals. Yet research has shown little benefit, and considerable potential harm, of such high dairy intakes. Moderate consumption of milk or other dairy products—one to two servings a day—is fine, and likely has some benefits for children. But it’s not essential for adults, for a host of reasons. That’s why the Healthy Eating Plate recommends limiting milk and dairy products to one to two servings per day, and drinking water with meals instead.”

What we consume each day is one of the main factors determining the level of our body’s health. The Healthy Eating Plate’s use of up-to-date science and information combined with the beneficial tips provided in the diagram (such as sticking with whole grains and consuming as many varieties of vegetables as possible), could help us stay on the right dietary track. We especially like the positive, user-friendly tone. Go, Crimson!



What’s Up? does not give medical advice. This material is simply a discussion of current information, trends, and topics. Please seek the advice of a physician before making any changes to your lifestyle or routine.