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Last Updated: May 29, 2012 06:12PM • Subscribe via RSSATOM

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It's Melanoma Monday: Go Get Checked Out!

May 07, 2012 ● By Anonymous

Doing a little detective work can go a long way in finding skin cancer, the most common form of cancer diagnosed in the United States, at its earliest, most treatable stage. However, a new survey found that many people do not know how to spot skin cancer and are unaware of their risk of developing the disease. In an effort to increase the public’s understanding of skin cancer and motivate people to change their behavior to prevent and detect skin cancer, the American Academy of Dermatology (Academy) today launched the new SPOT Skin Cancer™ public awareness initiative. The campaign’s simple tagline – “Prevent. Detect. Live.” – focuses on the positive actions people can take to protect themselves from skin cancer, including seeing a dermatologist when appropriate. “Unlike other types of cancer that can’t be seen by the naked eye, skin cancer shows obvious signs on the surface of the skin that can be easily detected by properly examining it,” said board-certified dermatologist Daniel M. Siegel, MD, FAAD, president, American Academy of Dermatology. “The goal of SPOT Skin Cancer™ is to help save lives by educating the public on how to protect themselves from the sun and how to examine their skin for suspicious spots.” In Easton, Shore Health System and the Talbot County Health Department is offering free screenings for adults 18 and older on May 16th. Appointments are available between 5pm and 8pm at the Talbot County Health Department, 100 S. Hanson Street in Easton. To schedule an appointment for the May 16 skin cancer screening, call Shore Regional Cancer Center, 410-820-6800. Almost three-quarters of respondents (74 percent) did not know that skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S.Only half (53 percent) of respondents knew how to examine their skin for signs of skin cancer.Thirty percent of respondents were either unsure or did not know that skin cancer can be easily treated when caught early.“When it comes to skin cancer, our survey demonstrates that knowledge is power,” said Dr. Siegel. “For example, respondents who know how to examine their skin for signs of skin cancer were more than twice as likely to have shown suspicious moles or spots to a medical professional as those who did not know how to spot the warning signs of skin cancer on their skin. In some instances, this knowledge can mean the difference between life and death, which is why it is so important to see a dermatologist if you notice a spot on your skin that is changing, itching or bleeding.”SKIN CANCER FACTS: More than 3.5 million skin cancer cases affecting 2 million people are diagnosed annually.Current estimates are that one in five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer in their lifetime.The five-year survival rate for people whose melanoma (the deadliest form of skin cancer) is detected and treated before it spreads to the lymph nodes is 98 percent.Monday, May 7, is Melanoma Monday® and the official launch of Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month®. Also debuting on Melanoma Monday® is the SPOT Skin Cancer™ program’s new website www.spotskincancer.org where visitors can learn how to perform a skin self-exam, download a body mole map for tracking changes in your skin, and find free skin cancer screenings in their area. Those affected by skin cancer also will be able to share their story via the website and download free materials to educate others in their community.

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What's Up Magazine
Never Too Old to Play

May 02, 2012 ● By Anonymous

The May 2012 theme for Older Americans Month is, Never Too Old to Play. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration on Aging, the month-long event salutes the contributions of Americans in the 65+ age category. The theme also encourages older Americans to maintain a healthy lifestyle. “Americans are living longer,” said Vivienne Halpern, MD, a member of the Society for Vascular Surgery®. “The average life expectancy is 83 years of age. More than 39.6 million Americans are over age 65. By comparison, there were just 17 million Americans over age 65 when President Kennedy created Older Americans Month in 1963. Back then, the average life expectancy was just 69.9 years.” Walk & Talk - The West Wing Reunion from Martin Sheen The ensuing 49 years has challenged Baby Boomers to remain active. “Thirty minutes of moderate physical activity each day is vital,” said Dr. Halpern. “Physical activity can help guard against the three leading causes of death today - heart disease, cancer, and stroke.” Physical activity can: Reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseaseLower blood pressureImprove cholesterol levels Reduce the risk for type 2 diabetes by helping to control glucose levelsReduce the risk of colon and breast cancerStrengthen bones and musclesKeep thinking, learning and judgment skills sharpMaintain a healthy weight“A 30 minute walk each day, a bike ride, swimming, a round of golf, or playing with grandkids are activities that can keep the heart pumping for years to come,” said Dr. Halpern. For information on physical activity and vascular health, log onto: www.VascularWeb.org.

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