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AAMC Foundation Names New Officers, Board Members for 2012-2013

Nov 20, 2012 ● By Anonymous

November 5, 2012 – The Anne Arundel Medical Center (AAMC) Foundation Board of Directors has named new officers and five new members for the upcoming year. The new Foundation officers are: JoAnn DeCesaris, of the Geaton & JoAnn DeCesaris Family Foundation, chair; Theodore Pincus, executive vice president and CFO, FTI Consulting, Inc., (Retired), vice chair; Judy Zazulia Wahl, community leader, secretary; Laura Westervelt, vice president of CBRE-CB Richard Ellis, treasurer.  New additions to the Foundation board include: Joseph Baldwin  Richard Franyo  Todd Mohr  James Roberts Lesly Sajak Joseph (Jay) Baldwin serves as President and CEO of Reliable Contracting Company. Baldwin also manages several residential and commercial real estate development companies and has been involved in some of the area's most successful projects. He is involved in many charitable and philanthropic activities and generously supports Anne Arundel Medical Center, Hospice of the Chesapeake and the University of Maryland.  Richard (Dick) Franyo is the proprietor of Boatyard Bar & Grill. In 2002, he retired from a 30-year career as an investment banker and managing director for Deutsche Bank Alex Brown in Baltimore. He is actively involved as a board member of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, National Sailing Hall of Fame (president), the Ocean Race Chesapeake, and the Annapolis & Anne Arundel County Conference & Visitors Bureau in addition to other community and civic organizations. He is a donor to AAMC. Todd Mohr is the president of Aerotek Inc., an operating company of Allegis Group Inc. He started his career at Aerotek as a technical recruiter in 1995 and has continued to expand his role into various areas of leadership. Mohr is a member of the Sellinger School Board of Sponsors, the business school of Loyola University Maryland. He also serves on the board of The Economic Alliance of Greater Baltimore (EAGB), and the non-profit organization “Ready to Give.”  James (Jim) Roberts retired as Chairman and CEO of Foundation Coal Holdings, Inc. in 2009. A veteran of the coal and energy sector, prior to his role with Foundation Coal, he served as president & CEO of RAG American Coal Holding, Inc. Roberts currently serves on the board of Alpha Natural Resources. He is a former director and a former chairman of the National Mining Association, a former director of the American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity, a former member of the executive committee of the National Coal Council, and the former vice-chair of the Coal Utilization Research Council.  In addition to generously supporting AAMC, Roberts also donates to the Hospice of the Chesapeake.  Lesly Sajak grew up in Gambrills and graduated from the University of Maryland College Park, with a degree in Radio, Television and Film. Upon graduation, she moved to Los Angeles to pursue her career. It was there that she met her husband, Pat Sajak. As supporters of AAMC, Sajak and her husband generously donated toward the Breast Center in 2001 and the Sajak Pavilion was named in recognition of their gift. Sajak was a member of the AAMC Foundation Board from 2002 to 2009 and also served on the board of Severn School.  Other members of the AAMC Foundation Board of Directors are: Catherine Adelman; Pamela Batstone; Victoria W. Bayless, president and CEO of Anne Arundel Health System; Brendan Gill, chair of the Building Traditions Society; John Kopkoswki, president of the AAMC Auxiliary; Martin L. Doordan, CEO Emeritus of Anne Arundel Health System; Doug Mitchell, M.D., past president of the AAMC medical staff;  Michael G. Foundos, Sr.; Philip Gibbs; Barry Gossett; Anthony Izzo; Henry Libby; Charles Moore, Jr.; Patricia McManus; Thomas J. Mulrenin; Cullen Murray; James Myers; Maria C. Scott, M.D.; Richard C. Springer; and Jerry South. Lisa Hillman is president of the Foundation.

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Dr. Vaidyanathan wins 2012 Cecil Award

Nov 20, 2012 ● By Anonymous

Lakshmi Vaidyanathan, MD, is the winner of the 2012 Arthur B. Cecil, Jr., MD Award for Excellence in Healthcare Improvement. Dr. Vaidyanathan was chosen from among five nominees for her work in developing a palliative care program for Shore Health System. Palliative care is a coordinated approach of physical, emotional and spiritual care with the goal to relieve suffering for patients with advanced illnesses. The Cecil Award for Excellence in Healthcare Improvement is named for Arthur B. Cecil, Jr., MD, a surgeon who practiced at Memorial Hospital from 1950 until 1988. The award was established to recognize Dr. Cecil’s commitment to using grand rounds to share the latest developments in the field of medicine. Dr. Cecil’s son, Arthur Cecil, III, presented the award to Dr. Vaidyanathan on October 18 at a special ceremony at the Tidewater Inn in Easton. Mr. Cecil, who serves on the Shore Health Patient Quality and Safety Committee, says, “Tonight we pay tribute to everyone who provides patient care at Shore Health. This award is one of many ways that Shore Health recognizes the teams of people who are committed to caring for patients.” Rosa Mateo, MD, and Paul Monte, MD, were finalists for the Cecil Award along with Dr. Vaidyanathan. Dr. Mateo, an infectious disease specialist, was cited for her role in eliminating healthcare associated infections through the Target Zero initiative. Dr. Monte, a specialist in hospital medicine, was cited for leading the venous thromboembolism risk assessment and prophylaxis initiative. The other 2012 Cecil Award nominees were cardiologist Scott Friedman, MD, and pediatrician Elizabeth Wroth, MD.

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A surprise mechanism uncovered in the development of lupus

Nov 20, 2012 ● By Anonymous

New Haven, Conn.— In a study with a surprising outcome, scientists at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that an enzyme complex known for promoting natural resistance to bacteria and fungi unexpectedly inhibits the development of lupus. The finding could pave the way for development of therapeutic interventions in this debilitating disease. The study appears online in the Oct. 24 issue of Science Translational Medicine (www.sciencetranslationalmedicine.org). Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the body’s healthy tissue rather than foreign pathogens, resulting in inflammation and damage to joints and internal organs. The etiology of lupus is not well understood, but the suspected cause is debris produced when cells die. The Yale researchers focused on a key enzyme complex in this process known as NADPH oxidase, or Nox2, and evaluated its role in lupus pathogenesis. Before this study, it was commonly thought that Nox2 might actively promote the development of lupus by facilitating the release of DNA from white blood cells called neutrophils in a process called NET (“neutrophil extracellular trap”) generation. To test that hypothesis, the Yale team evaluated disease in lupus-prone mice that lacked the Nox2 protein. Contrary to expectations, the Nox2-deficient mice whose neutrophils failed to generate NETs not only still got lupus, but got a much worse form of the disease. Surprised by the finding, researchers realized that normal function of Nox2 inhibits the development of lupus, rather than promoting it. They are now focusing their research on how Nox2 controls lupus. “Nox2 clearly has an important role in fighting infection and lupus is often triggered by infection. We suspect that Nox2 could be an important connection between response to infection and lupus flares,” said lead author Mark Shlomchik, M.D., professor of laboratory medicine and immunobiology at Yale School of Medicine. “We now plan to explore the mechanism by which NADPH oxidase is exerting its effects. Doing so should provide additional insights into the cause of this disease.” The implication for human cases of lupus could be enormous. “We suspect that without NADPH oxidase, neutrophils may die in a way that inflames the immune system,” Shlomchik explains. “This may help us develop therapies that promote NADPH oxidase function and thereby suppress disease.” Other authors are Allison Campbell and Michael Kashgarian of Yale School of Medicine. The study was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health.

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MSBR Donates $10,000 to Pediatrics Unit

Nov 15, 2012 ● By Anonymous

The Mid-Shore Board of Realtors (MSBR) recently donated $10,000 to the Pediatric Unit at Shore Health. MSBR won the 2012 C.A.R.E. award and a $10,000 check from the Maryland Association of Realtors and selected the Pediatric Unit as the charity to receive this contribution. The C.A.R.E. award is given to the REALTOR Association who displays outstanding achievements in community service, charitable and civic activities. The donation will fund updates to the Pediatric unit’s play area including new televisions and play equipment as well as upgraded clinical equipment. “We are very grateful to the Mid-Shore Board of Realtors for their generosity. Being in the hospital when you are little can be a very scary notion so having an updated play area provides a wonderful distraction for our youngest patients,” says Patty MacDougall, MSN, RN, Nurse Manager for Women and Children’s Services. “This gift helps our children to feel less scared and offer them a way to escape the boredom being admitted to the hospital and stuck in one room brings.” The donation will also be used to purchase several small pieces of equipment. The equipment includes new Bili Meters, used to assess for jaundice, and new pulse oximeters, used to assess blood oxygen levels. Both assessments are vital before discharging children and new babies home. The members of the Mid-Shore Board of Realtors, which serves Talbot, Dorchester and Caroline Counties, donated over 9,500 volunteer hours in a variety of activities, including Habitat for Humanity, local Boy Scouts, Youth Hockey Association and the Chamber Music Festival. With fewer than 500 members, the Mid-Shore Board raised over $600,000 and reached over 1,500 families with its volunteer activities.  

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