Skip to main content

What's Up Magazine

The Look

Last Updated: Jul 06, 2012 09:01PM • Subscribe via RSSATOM

Maryland Native Clark Rachfal named to Team USA for the 2012 London Paralympic Games

Jul 06, 2012 ● By Anonymous

On June 22, Clark Rachfal of Annapolis was nominated to for the U.S. Para-cycling team to compete at the 2012 Paralympic Games in London. Clark Rachfal began competing as a blind tandem cyclist with his sighted pilot, Dave Swanson (Tucson, AZ) after being introduced at a developmental cycling camp hosted by the U.S. Association of Blind Athletes (USABA) at the Colorado Springs Olympic Training Center in 2006. The following year the duo would compete for the U.S. Para-cycling National Team. “The nomination of Clark and Dave to the Paralympic Team is a testament to their hard work and dedication toward athletic excellence,” said Mark Lucas, executive director of USABA. He continued to say, “We are extremely proud for them to represent Team USA and USABA and wish them the best of luck in London.  I would also like to give a special word of thanks to Dave for his selflessness as a volunteer pilot for Clark.” After narrowly missing the Beijing Paralympic Team in 2008, Rachfal and Swanson became stalwarts of the U.S. Para-cycling Team in 2009. That year, Rachfal and Swanson won a World Championship on the velodrome in the 4km Pursuit at the 2009 UCI Para-cycling Track World Championships. In 2011, Rachfal and Swanson added the overall UCI Road World Cup Title and a Time Trial bronze medal from the UCI Road World Championships to their international accolades. “This team nomination proves how far Dave and I have come since we began racing together in 2007. It is a nice validation of all our hard work and support we receive from U.S. Paralympics staff and our personal sponsors such as Verizon Communications, the Challenged Athletes Foundation, PowerBar, USABA and Velocity USA. Dave and I know there is still plenty of work to be done, but it is comforting to know we are on the right track to perform at the level we expect as we push towards the London Paralympic Games,” said Clark Rachfal. The 2012 London Paralympic Games are August 29 – September 9, succeeding the London Olympic Games by two weeks. The pairs progress on the road to the 2012 Paralympic Games may be followed on Rachfal's blog (clarkrachfal.wordpress.com) and via Twitter (twitter.com/crachfal).

Read More »
What's Up Magazine
It's Melanoma Monday: Go Get Checked Out!

May 07, 2012 ● By Anonymous

Doing a little detective work can go a long way in finding skin cancer, the most common form of cancer diagnosed in the United States, at its earliest, most treatable stage. However, a new survey found that many people do not know how to spot skin cancer and are unaware of their risk of developing the disease. In an effort to increase the public’s understanding of skin cancer and motivate people to change their behavior to prevent and detect skin cancer, the American Academy of Dermatology (Academy) today launched the new SPOT Skin Cancer™ public awareness initiative. The campaign’s simple tagline – “Prevent. Detect. Live.” – focuses on the positive actions people can take to protect themselves from skin cancer, including seeing a dermatologist when appropriate. “Unlike other types of cancer that can’t be seen by the naked eye, skin cancer shows obvious signs on the surface of the skin that can be easily detected by properly examining it,” said board-certified dermatologist Daniel M. Siegel, MD, FAAD, president, American Academy of Dermatology. “The goal of SPOT Skin Cancer™ is to help save lives by educating the public on how to protect themselves from the sun and how to examine their skin for suspicious spots.” In Easton, Shore Health System and the Talbot County Health Department is offering free screenings for adults 18 and older on May 16th. Appointments are available between 5pm and 8pm at the Talbot County Health Department, 100 S. Hanson Street in Easton. To schedule an appointment for the May 16 skin cancer screening, call Shore Regional Cancer Center, 410-820-6800. Almost three-quarters of respondents (74 percent) did not know that skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the U.S.Only half (53 percent) of respondents knew how to examine their skin for signs of skin cancer.Thirty percent of respondents were either unsure or did not know that skin cancer can be easily treated when caught early.“When it comes to skin cancer, our survey demonstrates that knowledge is power,” said Dr. Siegel. “For example, respondents who know how to examine their skin for signs of skin cancer were more than twice as likely to have shown suspicious moles or spots to a medical professional as those who did not know how to spot the warning signs of skin cancer on their skin. In some instances, this knowledge can mean the difference between life and death, which is why it is so important to see a dermatologist if you notice a spot on your skin that is changing, itching or bleeding.”SKIN CANCER FACTS: More than 3.5 million skin cancer cases affecting 2 million people are diagnosed annually.Current estimates are that one in five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer in their lifetime.The five-year survival rate for people whose melanoma (the deadliest form of skin cancer) is detected and treated before it spreads to the lymph nodes is 98 percent.Monday, May 7, is Melanoma Monday® and the official launch of Melanoma/Skin Cancer Detection and Prevention Month®. Also debuting on Melanoma Monday® is the SPOT Skin Cancer™ program’s new website www.spotskincancer.org where visitors can learn how to perform a skin self-exam, download a body mole map for tracking changes in your skin, and find free skin cancer screenings in their area. Those affected by skin cancer also will be able to share their story via the website and download free materials to educate others in their community.

Read More »